Yau Kung Mun

Yau Kung Mun (also Yau Kung Moon and YKM) (Chinese: 柔功門) is a Southern Chinese martial art that originated in the Tang Dynasty  (618-907 CE) with a Shaolin (Siu Lum) monk named Ding Yang (~800 CE) and is closely related to Bak Mei.

The Chinese term, 柔功門, can be roughly translated as "the style of flexible power".

Origins

According to traditional lore, this style was taught only to monks within the confines of the Southern Siu Lum Temple . During the time of the Qing Dybasty (1644-1911 CE) the temple was again destroyed and many of the monks were hunted and killed. One of the surviving monks was Doe Sung – a skilled Yau Kung Mun disciple. Doe Sung then taught a Buddhist monk named Tit Yun. Tit Yun was the first to pass the tradition on to a layperson when he accepted Ha Hon Hung (1892–1962) as a disciple in 1915. Ha Hon Hung had also studied Choy Lee Fut with his brother Ha Sang, and Bak Mei with Jeung Lai Chuen.

 

Stylistic Distinctions

The Yau Kung Mun System is representative of southern styles in being based on a low, stable horse stance. It employs many upper body techniques and most kicks are kept low. The YKM stance resembles the familiar "ding gee ma" or Kung Fu side horse but back arch is more pronounced and the shoulders are thrown forward with arms and hands protecting the chest and groin area. Defense is natural since the critical areas of the body are behind the protective wall of the shoulders and arms. Kicks or punches delivered within range of the practitioner would still be out of range of vital areas. This same stance also lends itself readily to offense as the arms are already in the attack position and the back leg has the distance of leverage required for powerful kicking.

Yau Kung Mun has both an external and internal training. However, like most other styles of Kung Fu renowned for their internal power, the individual system's manifestation of internal power is still somewhat secretive. The majority of early forms are primarily external while the most advanced forms evolve into primarily internal

 

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